Feeling It Out: What We Do When We Get Together

On letter writing as collaboration and a space for imagination.

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The Community Bears Witness

As a means of gathering feedback on the new sculptural presence, Thomas J Price: Witness, in the neighborhood, the Studio Museum’s Education staff interviewed several park-goers and participants in a writing workshop program.

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Studio Check In With Jamal Batts

In this edition of Studio Check In, Ilk Yasha speaks with Jamal Batts, a transdisciplinary scholar, curator, and writer who participated in the fall 2021 cohort of Museum Professionals Seminar.  

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Texas Isaiah on (Intimate) Community

The poignancy of Texas Isaiah’s work lies in his ability to reimagine the healing potential of photography for Black people, particularly Black trans, gender expansive, and nonbinary folks.

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Texas Isaiah on (Intimate) Community

The poignancy of Texas Isaiah’s work lies in his ability to reimagine the healing potential of photography for Black people, particularly Black trans, gender expansive, and nonbinary folks.

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Texas Isaiah on (Intimate) Community

The poignancy of Texas Isaiah’s work lies in his ability to reimagine the healing potential of photography for Black people, particularly Black trans, gender expansive, and nonbinary folks.

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Texas Isaiah on (Intimate) Community

You have described the intimacy between you, the people in your photographs, and the camera as “creating with individuals and narratives” rather than serving as onlookers. How have you been able to navigate changes in intimacy in the photographic process alongside the

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Studio Check In With Brett Cook

In this Studio Check In, Ilk Yasha speaks with Brett Cook, an interdisciplinary artist and educator who was an artist in residence at The Studio Museum in Harlem from 1997 to 1998.

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Studio Check In With Brett Cook

Studio Check In was born from a desire to tell the stories of the people that work behind the scenes at different arts and cultural institutions.

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Studio Check In With Brett Cook

I always begin with a simple question to introduce our interviewee to our readers. Can you begin by telling the readers a little about yourself, please?  

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Bronze Women: Notes on a Womanist Praxis

This piece was sparked by Simone Leigh. I’ve admired her for ages because of how she shows respect to the Black sisterhood: honoring her foremothers, building with her sisters, mothers, and aunties, nurturing the young ones who will later join the ranks. I sought to study, understand, and ultimately join that legacy of Black women creating Black women in our own image. So while I was an intern at The Studio Museum in Harlem, I was also a studio apprentice at the Modern Art Foundry in Astoria, Queens where I learned to cast bronze sculptures using the lost wax method. For eight weeks, I experienced an intimate connection to bronze-making by casting my own hands step-by-step. However, it wasn’t until I was carefully carving into a wax mold of my hand that it finally crystallized: I was creating myself. Though the flesh of my skin and the flesh of bronze held significant differences beyond materiality, I saw many similarities in the two types of (Black female) being. That realization moved me to speculate on what bronze-making is like from a Black female perspective, and to listen, view, and read the sculptures made by other Black women on a deeper level. 

Inspired by the many layers that make up the skin: the epidermis, dermis, and hypodermis—I structured this poetic response to mimic the layers that go into bronze-making—the God complex, the outer layer, and the inner layer—to honor Black women who contributed a great deal to each layer.  

This piece is for women like Augusta Savage, who, unbeknownst to many, were working in the tradition of bronze-making despite lack of access to the material because when there is no way, we make one. This piece is for the daughters of the dust, for women whose labor has been part sacrifice and part allegiance. 

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