Studio Check In With Anaïs Duplan

In this edition of Studio Check In, Ilk Yasha speaks with Anaïs Duplan, a trans* poet, curator, and artist.

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Studio Check In With Jeary Payne

In this edition of Studio Check In, Ilk Yasha speaks with Jeary Payne, an educator at the Met and artist who participated in the Fall 2019 session of Museum Education Practicum. 

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Partners in Conversation: Ms. Muñoz

Partners in Conversation is an interview series that highlights the Studio Museum’s partnership educators, school leadership, artists, and community organization staff. These interviews seek to document and archive their experiences and to share their stories—in their own words—of connecting to the Studio Museum, Harlem, and artists of African descent.

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Black Radical Imagination

By Clara I. Díaz, Tiera Lee, Andrea Lewis, Anthony Reid, Alexandra M. Thomas, Amiri Tulloch

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Pieces of Tomorrow

On versatile institutions and solving for X. 

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Learning and Working Together

On coalition-building and radical museum transformation. 

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Feeling It Out: What We Do When We Get Together

On letter writing as collaboration and a space for imagination.

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The Community Bears Witness

As a means of gathering feedback on the new sculptural presence, Thomas J Price: Witness, in the neighborhood, the Studio Museum’s Education staff interviewed several park-goers and participants in a writing workshop program.

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Studio Check In With Jamal Batts

In this edition of Studio Check In, Ilk Yasha speaks with Jamal Batts, a transdisciplinary scholar, curator, and writer who participated in the fall 2021 cohort of Museum Professionals Seminar.  

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Texas Isaiah on (Intimate) Community

The poignancy of Texas Isaiah’s work lies in his ability to reimagine the healing potential of photography for Black people, particularly Black trans, gender expansive, and nonbinary folks.

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Texas Isaiah on (Intimate) Community

The poignancy of Texas Isaiah’s work lies in his ability to reimagine the healing potential of photography for Black people, particularly Black trans, gender expansive, and nonbinary folks.

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