fbpx Museum Professionals Seminar | The Studio Museum in Harlem

Museum Professionals Seminar

The Museum Professionals Seminar is a brand new digital program designed to provide professional development inspired by the Studio Museum’s mission. The Seminar is a series of educational workshops aimed at supporting museum professionals looking to incubate, ideate, and network. The program promotes discussion, interaction, and exposure with special attention to skill-building and career-readiness. Workshops will include exchanges with staff and leadership from the Studio Museum and across arts and cultural institutions.

The program will make space for new and emerging professionals to build community while learning and discussing contemporary issues relevant to the arts and culture sector. Weekly readings will be assigned to help steer conversations around relevant topic areas, which include cultural specificity, curatorial practice, arts administration, education, and public programming.

This Seminar takes place on Zoom and Google Classroom. 

For any questions regarding applications please visit our FAQs

Applications are welcome from undergraduates, graduate students, and early-career professionals seeking opportunities to broaden their knowledge of the field amid shifting employment landscape. The program will occur on Tuesday from July 6— August 3, 2021.

Application Deadline: 11:59pm EDT on April 25, 2021.

Dates: July 6, July 13, July 20, July 27, August 3

Program Time: 5:00pm —8:00pm

Honorarium: $250 for completion of the program

For any questions regarding applications please feel free to contact SMI@studiomuseum.org.

Final Reflections

Fall 2020 Studio Museum Professional Seminar Participants co-authored reflection essays based on themes and topics from the Seminar series. The reflection pieces range from the poetic to the practical, and everything in between. The themes, ideas, and notions discussed in the essays critically reflect on the contemporary moment as well as the conditions from which artistic and cultural production is possible.

2020

Meditations on Curatorial Labor

Claudia Delaplace, Ella Ray, Tyra A. Seals, Delphine Sims, TK Smith

In coming together to share our thoughts on the current state of the curatorial field, the subject of labor was the most urgent to address. The following individual contributions form a dialogue that

In coming together to share our thoughts on the current state of the curatorial field, the subject of labor was the most urgent to address. The following individual contributions form a dialogue that resists, laments, claims, reveres, and speculates on curatorial labor.


Reinventing Museums: The Necessity of a Critically Reimagined Future

Carmen Beals, Anaya Adams, Nakeeya Garland, Kendyl Boyd, Kaelin Keller

The History of the Museum Why Museums Do Not Work in Today’s Society Reconstruction, Representation, and Responsibility Community and Mutual Aid and Benefit Organizations That Work

The History of the Museum Why Museums Do Not Work in Today’s Society Reconstruction, Representation, and Responsibility Community and Mutual Aid and Benefit Organizations That Work


“Revolution Is Not a One Time Event”: Slowness and Care in Art and Cultural Institutions

Deja Belardo, Yatil Etherly, Kendyll Gross, Jaelynn Walls, Chinelo Ufondu

Slowness and care are not radical acts. Black women, Black men, Black people have taught us that they’re necessary. We still fight the same injustices forced upon us for centuries in this country, and

Slowness and care are not radical acts. Black women, Black men, Black people have taught us that they’re necessary. We still fight the same injustices forced upon us for centuries in this country, and we fight with persistence and intention. Black feminists have shown us that the work can be done with care.


Philanthropy in Museums - Where Do We Go From Here? 

Omolade Olubowale, Sebastian Pierre, Tritia Lee, Emmanuel Woolard, Sydney Murphy

America’s arts and cultural sector has been one of the hardest-hit industries from the economic downturn caused by COVID-19. With a full stop on key revenue streams such as admissions, events, and

America’s arts and cultural sector has been one of the hardest-hit industries from the economic downturn caused by COVID-19. With a full stop on key revenue streams such as admissions, events, and retail sales, museums are left in a situation in which their dependence on charitable giving and philanthropy is greater than ever.