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Artists in Residence 2021–22 Roundtable

The Studio Museum in Harlem 2021–22 artists in residence. (L to R) Cameron Granger. Photo: Dejiah Archie-Davis; Qualeasha Wood. Photo: Jeremy Grier; Jacob Mason-Macklin. Photo: Jeremy Grier

 

Nov 18, 2022
1:00pm
—3:00pm

Zoom

Join us for an online discussion with 2021–22 Studio Museum artists in residence Cameron Granger, Jacob Mason-Macklin, and Qualeasha Wood moderated by Yelena Keller, Assistant Curator. In celebration of the opening of It’s time for me to go: Studio Museum Artists in Residence 2021–22, hear the artists speak about the work they created over the course of the residency program. 

In addition to the discussion between Granger, Mason-Macklin, and Wood, there will be a special behind-the-scenes walk-through of the exhibition and an audience Q&A. 

It’s time for me to go opens to the public at MoMA PS1 on November 17, 2022, and closes on February 27, 2023. 

Live CART captioning and ASL interpretation will be provided.  

 

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Cameron Granger
Video still of Before I Let Go, 2022 

2 / 3

Jacob Mason-Macklin
NightRyde, 2022 

3 / 3

Qualeasha Wood
Error404, 2022

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Cameron A. Granger (b. 1993, Cleveland, OH; currently based in Columbus, OH) is Sandra’s son and came up in Cleveland, Ohio. Inspired by the rigorous, careful archival practices of his grandmother,

Cameron A. Granger (b. 1993, Cleveland, OH; currently based in Columbus, OH) is Sandra’s son and came up in Cleveland, Ohio. Inspired by the rigorous, careful archival practices of his grandmother, Pearl, Granger uses his work as a means to quilt the histories of his communities, redacted by empire, into new, not just potential, but inevitable futures. His recent projects include “Everybody's got a little light under the sun,” a free food and short-film program made in collaboration with Willowbeez Soul Veg and the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio; and “The Get Free Telethon” a twenty-four-hour livestreamed community fundraiser for Columbus groups Black Queer Intersectional Collective, Healing Broken Circles, and Columbus Freedom Coalition, sponsored by Red Bull Arts. A 2017 alumnus of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Granger has exhibited his work at The Bemis Center, Omaha, Nebraska (2021); Ortega y Gasset Projects, New York (2019); and Platform Rf, Vaasa, Finland (2019).


Jacob Mason-Macklin (b. 1995, Columbus, OH; lives and works in Queens, NY) examines how painting, in the age of social media, post-camera and after the Patriot Act, functions as a tool for looking and

Jacob Mason-Macklin (b. 1995, Columbus, OH; lives and works in Queens, NY) examines how painting, in the age of social media, post-camera and after the Patriot Act, functions as a tool for looking and surveillance. With slashing, cutting, and undulating brushstrokes, Mason-Macklin distorts and repurposes archival images and recollected imagery in an attempt to simultaneously embrace, explore, and unsettle motifs of libido and violence as typified in counterculture iconography. Currently, Mason-Macklin uses personal and collected imagery, inspired by his observations in Harlem, to make paintings that imagine scenarios wherein the public and private collapse—questioning the point at which looking becomes surveillance, and the implications of acts of seeing.

Mason-Macklin is a 2016 alumnus of the Yale-Norfolk Summer School of Art and a 2019 alumnus of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. Mason-Macklin has had two-person and solo exhibitions including Ryan Huggins and Jacob Mason-Macklin, Page, New York (2021); Soul Procession, Interstate Projects, New York (2020); PURE HELL, No Place Gallery, Columbus, Ohio (2020); and BOUNTY, Jeffrey Stark Gallery (with Cudelice Brazelton), New York (2017).


Qualeasha Wood (b.1996, Long Branch, NJ; lives and works Brooklyn, NY) is a textile artist whose work contemplates Black female embodiment. Inspired by a familial relationship to textiles, craft,

Qualeasha Wood (b.1996, Long Branch, NJ; lives and works Brooklyn, NY) is a textile artist whose work contemplates Black female embodiment. Inspired by a familial relationship to textiles, craft, Microsoft Paint, and internet avatars, Wood's tufted and tapestry pieces mesh traditional craft and contemporary technological materials. Wood navigates both an internet environment saturated in Black femme figures and culture and a political and economic environment that holds this embodiment at the margins. Like the vast majority of her peers, Wood has operated multiple digital avatars since pre-adolescence. For her, intuitive combinations of analog and cybernetic compositional processes make for a contemporary exploration of Black American femme ontology. 

Wood has exhibited at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (2021); Hauser & Wirth, New York (2022); Art Basel Miami Beach with Kendra Jayne Patrick, Miami (2021); Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London (2021); CANADA, New York (2021); the Trout Museum of Art, Appleton, Wisconsin; NADA Miami Beach with Kendra Jayne Patrick, New York (2020); Kendra Jayne Patrick for Metro Pictures, New York (2020); Cooper Cole, Toronto (2019); New Image Art, Los Angeles (2018); Gaa Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts (2020). 


The title phrase, "It’s time for me to go," proposes the gallery as a site of both departure and arrival, and the act of making as an experience of release and embrace. With practices spanning new media, painting, and textiles, these artists explore the relationships and tensions among physical, digital, and psychic space. As the title suggests, the works in this exhibition grapple with the tenderness of loss, the expansiveness of change, and the weight of becoming. In turn, imagining the future becomes an invitation to remember.

Cameron Granger explores how architecture, geography, and community function as containers for memories. The installations on view honor his late grandmother and serve as a remembrance of the house she lived in, and the memories made in community within it. Jacob Mason- Macklin’s new series of paintings traces the subtle collapse of public versus private that occurs where sidewalks and streets become gathering sites charged with human interaction in a shared space. Drawing inspiration from the streets of Harlem, Mason-Macklin’s paintings wrestle with the boundaries between looking, surveilling, and seeing. Qualeasha Wood’s work confronts and reclaims the experience of navigating and existing on the internet as a Black femme. Her textile-based works explore the duality of being both celebrated and reviled by recognizing and amplifying the gaze cast upon her.

Exhibition

It’s time for me to go: Studio Museum Artists in Residence 2021–22

Event

Artist-in-Residence Open Studios | 2021–22

Playlist

Listen to a playlist curated by the 2021–22 artists in residence 

The Studio Museum in Harlem’s Artist-in-Residence program is supported by the Glenstone Foundation; The American Express Kenneth and Kathryn Chenault Sponsorship Fund; National Endowment for the Arts; Joy of Giving Something; Robert Lehman Foundation; New York State Council on the Arts; Doris Duke Charitable Foundation; Jerome Foundation; Anonymous; Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation; and by endowments established by the Andrea Frank Foundation; the Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Trust; and Rockefeller Brothers Fund. Additional support has been provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs. 

 

Support for It’s time for me to go at MoMA PS1 is generously provided by the Tom Slaughter Exhibition Fund and the MoMA PS1 Annual Exhibition Fund.