fbpx Artist-in-Residence Open Studios | The Studio Museum in Harlem

Artist-in-Residence
Open Studios | 2021–22

L to R: Cameron Granger. Photo: Cameron Granger;
Qualeasha Wood. Photo: JaLeel Porcha;
Jacob Mason-Macklin. Photo: Ally Caple

Mar 31, 2022
7:00pm

Zoom

Artist-in-Residence, Watch & Listen 2022

The Studio Museum presents an online edition of its annual Artists-in-Residence Open Studios. Meet 2021–22 artists in residence Cameron Granger, Jacob Mason-Macklin, and Qualeasha Wood and be among the first to hear them discuss their works in progress, creative visions, and initial connections to each other’s practices. Conceived at the formation of the Studio Museum over fifty years ago, the Artist-in-Residence program remains central to the Museum's mission. 

This program will be streamed on Zoom and will feature live CART captioning and ASL interpretation. 

Artist Bios

Cameron A. Granger (b. 1993, Cleveland, OH; lives and works in Columbus, OH) came up in Cleveland, Ohio, alongside his mother, Sandra, inheriting her love of soul music and the habit of apologizing

Cameron A. Granger (b. 1993, Cleveland, OH; lives and works in Columbus, OH) came up in Cleveland, Ohio, alongside his mother, Sandra, inheriting her love of soul music and the habit of apologizing too much. Granger uses his video work as a site for memory-making and a means to strategize new ways of remembrance in this age of mass media. His recent projects include “Everybody's got a little light under the sun” (2020), a free food and short film program made in collaboration with Willowbeez Soul Veg and the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio, and “The Get Free Telethon” (2020), a twenty-four-hour livestream community fundraiser for the Columbus groups Black Queer Intersectional Collective, Healing Broken Circles, and Columbus Freedom Coalition, sponsored by Red Bull Arts. A 2017 alumnus of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Granger has exhibited his work at The Bemis Center, Omaha, Nebraska (2021); Ortega y Gasset Projects, New York (2019); and Platform Rf, Vaasa, Finland (2019). 


Jacob Mason-Macklin’s (b. 1995, Columbus, OH; lives and works in Queens, NY) paintings explore the collision between frustration and desire. His practice is driven by a fascination with images from

Jacob Mason-Macklin’s (b. 1995, Columbus, OH; lives and works in Queens, NY) paintings explore the collision between frustration and desire. His practice is driven by a fascination with images from popular and underground film and media in the United States. With slashing, cutting, and undulating brushstrokes, Mason-Macklin's paintings distort and repurpose archival images of centerfold spreads, stills from Blaxploitation films, and cover art from R&B and funk albums like James Brown’s Hell (1974) and Marvin Gaye's I Want You (1976). Through his paintings, Mason-Macklin seeks to simultaneously embrace, explore, and unsettle motifs of libido and violence as typified in counterculture iconography. Mason-Macklin is a 2016 alumnus of the Yale-Norfolk Summer School of Art and a 2019 alumnus of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. Mason-Macklin has had two-person and solo exhibitions including Ryan Huggins and Jacob Mason-Macklin at Page, New York (2021); Soul Procession at Interstate Projects, New York (2020); PURE HELL at No Place Gallery, Columbus, Ohio (2020); and BOUNTY at Jeffrey Stark Gallery (with Cudelice Brazelton), New York (2017).  


Qualeasha Wood (b.1996 Long Branch NJ; lives and works Brooklyn, NY) is a textile artist whose work contemplates Black female embodiment. Inspired by a familial relationship to textiles, craft,

Qualeasha Wood (b.1996 Long Branch NJ; lives and works Brooklyn, NY) is a textile artist whose work contemplates Black female embodiment. Inspired by a familial relationship to textiles, craft, Microsoft Paint, and internet avatars, Wood's tufted and tapestry pieces mesh traditional craft and contemporary technological materials. Wood navigates both an internet environment saturated in Black femme figures and culture and a political and economic environment that holds this embodiment at the margins. Like the vast majority of her peers, Wood has operated multiple digital avatars since pre-adolescence. For her, intuitive combinations of analog and cybernetic compositional processes make for a contemporary exploration of Black American femme ontology. 

Wood has exhibited at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (2021); Hauser & Wirth, New York (2022); Art Basel Miami Beach with Kendra Jayne Patrick, Miami (2021); Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London (2021); CANADA, New York (2021); the Trout Museum of Art, Appleton, Wisconsin; NADA Miami Beach with Kendra Jayne Patrick, New York (2020); Kendra Jayne Patrick for Metro Pictures, New York (2020); Cooper Cole, Toronto (2019); New Image Art, Los Angeles (2018); Gaa Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts (2020). 


The Studio Museum in Harlem’s Artist-in-Residence program is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts; Joy of Giving Something; Robert Lehman Foundation; New York State Council on the Arts; Doris Duke Charitable Foundation; Jerome Foundation; Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation; and by endowments established by the Andrea Frank Foundation; the Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Trust; and Rockefeller Brothers Fund.  

Digital programming is made possible thanks to support provided by the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation’s Frankenthaler Digital Initiative. 

Additional support is generously provided by The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.