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Love as a Practice

As we attempt to strike anew this year, it seems necessary to operate from a place of compassionate, generous love—for our community, for those who’ve worked tirelessly to provide, produce, and care for our loved ones, and for ourselves. As says the late bell hooks (1952–2021), the practice of love remains central to social justice work: “The moment we choose to love, we begin to move against domination, against oppression. The moment we choose to love, we begin to move toward freedom, to act in ways that liberate ourselves and others.*” Just as experiences with art can inspire relief from the material world, so can the will to love. This curated selection of artworks present scenes of beauty, prayer, pleasure, and all-encompassing, unconditional love.

 

 

*hooks, bell. “Love as the Practice of Freedom.” Outlaw Culture: Resisting Representations, Routledge, New York, 1994.

 

Love as a Practice was organized by Habiba Hopson, Curatorial Assistant, Collections.

1 / 11

Reality Check: To Call Police Use This Phone

2 / 11

My Name is My Name I

3 / 11

Daphne

4 / 11

Surrendered (A Harrowing Descent)

5 / 11

Life Go On

6 / 11

Chocolate Nguva

7 / 11

Untitled (Afronude)

8 / 11

Hide 'n' Seek, Kill or Speak

9 / 11

Nwantinti

10 / 11

Untitled (Black Love)

11 / 11

Narcissus

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